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13 Weeks to 13 Miles - Training For A Half Marathon  

By Susan S. Paul, MS Training Program Director for Track Shack Fitness Club

If you can run 3 miles, you can run 13.1 miles! What??!! Seriously! And, here’s how. If you can run 3 miles, then running 3 more miles sounds doable, right? That gets you to 6 miles. Then, if you can run 6 miles, what’s 4 more? Now, you are at 10 miles! Think about that...10 miles! If you can run 10 miles, then 3 more miles is easy, right? And, if you run 13 miles, surely you can eek out another one-tenth to cross the finish line! So, like I said, if you can run 3 miles, you can run 13.1 miles, especially if you get started right now! Start your training now for the 40th OUC Orlando Half Marathon so you have plenty of time to begin increasing mileage in small increments.

Experts recommend increasing weekly mileage by 10 to 20% of your total weekly volume. That means if you are currently running 3
miles, three times a week, for a total of 9 miles each week, you could increase your weekly mileage by 1 to 2 miles each week. Mileage increases are typically done by lengthening the distance of your weekend run. Most people tend to have more time to devote to training on the weekend, but one of the advantages of running is that you can adapt training mileage to fit your particular schedule. You can make your long run day any day of the week that works for you, it doesn’t have to be a Saturday or a Sunday. If 3 miles has been your longest run distance to date, try taking it up to 4 miles this weekend and begin your gradual build.

Cross-training can also be incorporated into your running plan. means doing things other than running. Consider supplementing your running with more cardio by cross training with swimming or spinning classes. Also, of great importance is muscle strength and flexibility. Additional exercise classes like Yoga, Pilates, calisthenics, weight training, stretching, or boot camp can be very beneficial by boosting your overall fitness level and even improving your running. Always give yourself at least one or two days completely off from all training each week for adequate recovery time. Rest and recovery are an important part of your training plan too and are often overlooked until fatigue, injury, or burn-out occurs. Plan your training out ahead of time each week so a specific day and time are designated for each workout. Don’t leave it up to “chance”. Consistency is the key to success, so make your commitment to go the distance today!













Need more inspiration?  View more Training Talk blog.

Next group training sessions begin October 10, 2016.

Zero to Fit A 10-week, group-coached program for adults ready to improve their overall fitness through running and walking.

Five and Dime A 10-week program for adults to improve their 5k and 10k times.

Cheetahs Running Club For kids age 8-12 who want to learn proper running techniques while having fun. Packed with games, practice runs and a focus on sportsmanship.


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